Chancellor ignores calls for flights tax cut

Written by Mark Avery on Thursday, 22 March 2012. Posted in News from 2012, News

Calls to stop next month's above-inflation flights tax increase have been ignored by the Chancellor.

Yesterday's (March 21) spring Budget made no mention of the hugely controversial Air Passenger Duty (APD) fee that all travellers have to pay on flights taking off from UK airports.

This comes despite a rare show of unity from rival airlines against the tax hike. APD will increase by eight per cent from April 1, meaning a family of four taking return flights from Glasgow to London will pay £208 in APD alone. A family of four taking flights from the UK to Orlando will have to fork out a whopping £520 in APD charges.

Responding to the Budget, the bosses of easyJet, British Airways, Virgin Atlantic and Ryanair said in a joint statement: "At a time when the Government talks about creating jobs and growth, its blinkered insistence on further increases in APD achieves precisely the opposite.

"International visitors are being turned off the UK because of the exorbitant level of APD - which is by far the highest air travel tax in the world.

"In every other leading country, aviation is an expanding industry that underpins and facilitates growth in other parts of the economy. In the UK, rises of up to 360 per cent in APD in the last seven years are squeezing the life out of the economy."

About the Author

Mark Avery

Mark Avery

Mark Avery wanted to be a Concorde pilot, but being colour blind put a halt to that particular career path. The demise of Concorde didn't help matters either! He took up journalism instead. Following a stint moaning about Coventry City's plight for a living, the dad of two girls is now is in charge of all things editorial at flightmapping.com.

Comments (1)

  • JockinBristol

    JockinBristol

    10 April 2012 at 17:44 |
    This just means that more and more people will find ways to avoid it. I'd rather enjoy a ferry trip across to Dublin and then fly from there, or a quick hop to any mainland European hub so Georgie only gets the shorthaul tax, not the long haul rip off.

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